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. in june of 2009, fbi directer acknowledged the challenge facing the bureau stating, "it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate the terrorist attack developing intelligence, developing facts. and the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the directer's statement. and then on november 5, 2009, a gunman walked in the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas and shouted the jihaddic term. and opened fire on unarmed soldiers and civilians. he killed 13 and wounded 43 42 others. was the most horrific terrorist attack on the u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will exam the facts of the fort hood case as we know them to better understand how these facts that seem so obviously alarming now were so missed by seasoned professionals and to understand how the fbi
of the terrorism training camps. met weathered and mohamed and the fbi was interested in him. faris was questioned beginning in mar of 2003. and during the interviews with faris, he mentioned the conversation they had with and the idea of shooting up a shopping mall. and also the name of christopher paul, the third man at this coffee shop came up. authorities started to piece it together and eventually in a sort of slow domino effect, the three were arrested and charged. so faris, the pakistan immigrant was ultimately pleaded guilty to two chargeses of terrorism-related crimes. he pleaded guilty in a secret closed deal in may in virginia. may of 2003. the idea was that he had a lot to have offer the government and he might be able to get a reduction in the sentence based orb the information he could provide. unfortunately the case leaked, and government was forced to publicize his conviction that june. and at that point, everything went to heck. he was upset. he lost the bargaining chip. they were extremely interested in the somali immigrant. he ran a cell phone shop and had a family. they were tr
to government cyber and wisdom sitting next to secret service agents and fbi agents so they're all sharing the information in near real-time, machine to machine speed, not necessarily just human to human. so they can get that overall operational picture to identify cyber risk. and then it becomes actionable because the energy sector person sits there and says, that's important to me in this way, and i need that information to protect my sector which may be different than what the water person sees. so than by doing that and collecting and sharing classified information them unclassified information, per type -- proprietary information, we have a better idea of what activity is and how the activity propagates through these various sectors. so it's something that can be enhanced. is something that can be expanded on that is something that currently exists. >> so that is an effective system, capability to provide the very similar information sharing to what congress would like to legislate. is there an awareness problem? >> i think it's an evolutionary problem. so we started the capability, a
and until the f.b.i. identified everyone involved and in the custody of the united states. this is while our foreign policy would be determined by half a dozen unruly people anywhere in the world. i've seen unworkable and unwise legislation before. this may win the prize. it would be a colossal waste of f.b.i. resources be impossible to implement and those in this country who believe in freedom of speech are we really going to fill up our prison with thousands of foreigners including those who engage in peaceful demonstrations because it includes them. are we really going to cut off aid to the government of egypt which has reaffirmed its peace agreement with israel, sent troops against the egyptian extremists in the sinai deploy police to protect the u.s. embassy and is negotiating an agreement to reform its economy. are we also going to cut off aid to israel, which we do, of course. so mr. president i ask my full statement be placed in the record. like so many republicans and democrats who have spoken against this, it makes no sense. the presiding officer: without objection, the full statem
counterterrorism center, the fbi come in the very charged with attacking our nation from terrorism and other disasters will be flashed in an indiscriminate way that it are signs were more potentially harming such vital programs as border security, intelligence analysis and the fbi's work. i have time and budget constraints require everyone to sacrifice and priorities to be sat and ways to be eliminated, we should ask where resources can be spent more effectively and what trade-offs should be made to balance the risk we face with the security we can afford. but we cannot afford, however is to weaken a homeland security structure that is helping to protect the citizens of this country. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, secretary collins. secretary napolitano correct thank you for being with us through at the time through >> thank you through lieberman through like to thank director olson further partnership. mr. chairman, this is my 17th appearance before you. is my 44th here in overall since becoming president. i'm grateful for the tireless advocacy on behalf of dhs, not only during its
, from the f.b.i., and from the administration discussing this very question. gathering all the information we possibly can, making sure we have the facts before we make a quick judgment about the role of libya, the role of terrorists and what we've seen to date. it's a response by the libyan government, even the firing of one of their top officials who made an inappropriate remark relative to this attack. so, in conclusion, madam president, i encourage my colleagues to pause and look at the larger picture when it comes to foreign aid. cutting off aid and disengaging from these countries is exactly what the perpetrators of these attacks and protesters are trying to achieve. i do not know if supporting the governments in this volatile region in this revolutionary movement will bring us the results we so urgently need. but if we are to review thoroughly the tools available to us -- and i'm convinced that we must -- we should not begin by throwing out the tools that we have. we need to sharpen those tools and better define their use but not discard them prematurely. madam presi
a drill agencies like homeland security, fbi, border patrol is using drugs on the southern and northern border. they've been giving out to companies that make the drones. permits have been issued to some universities that are working with the pentagon and they've been given to about 30 police departments to experiment with drugs. well, the drug manufacturers have been very upset with the faa and send the, this is a growth industry. we need a market. we need to solve these drones at home. but speed up this process. so what do they do? they formed their own lobby group in the new piece of legislation and they got their own members of congress to form a drone caucus. now think about all the things you can have a caucus about to help schoolchildren, to feed the homeless. i mean, a million things. there's a group of 58 congresspeople do think it's their duty elected by we the people to go into congress and address what they say is the urgent need to see more of these unmanned vehicles being used both overseas and here in the united states. so they passed a piece of legislation on february 14
for fbi, not cia. okay? this is a job for the michigan state police, not the department of defense. okay. by the way, by and large most of the information we knew, okay, we knew about umar farouk abdulmutallab, the guy coming into detroit was all foreign derived. i think it was mistake to mirandize him in 50 minutes because our base of him is foreign intelligence. to me the right entry point was, enemy combatant, nation at war, deal with it that way. on the other hand if someone is discovered and prevented in an attack in the united states by the fbi the roots of that information are law enforcement derived. the going in position is we ought to treat this as a law enforcement problem and enter this into the american court system. i suppose if we stayed her long enough we could think of exceptions but in broad measure my sense is that is how we should deal with it. i hope made it worth your while coming here this afternoon. i hope you have left with more questions than you had when you came in. that was my intent. and thank you very much for the opportunity. and, go air force. [applause]
in benghazi? and to that, the fbi says it is too dangerous to be in benghazi why none of them are there now. is that because the situation has worsened or was the always that dangerous in benghazi? >> i think, on the terrorist attack i mean, as we determined the details of what took place there, and how that, attack took place, that it became clear that there were terrorists who had planned that attack and that's when i came to that conclusion. as again, as to who was involved, what specific groups were involved, i think the investigation that is ongoing hopefully will determine that. >> a day after or, was -- >> took a while to really get some of the feedback from what exactly happened at that location. >> there was a thread of intelligence reporting that that groups in the environment in western, correction, eastern libya were seeking to coalesce but there wasn't anything specific and certainly not a specific threat to the consulate that i'm aware of. and, as far as to the risks that the fbi reported to you, really have to ask them for why they made that determination. i don't know. >> wa
are inspired by the ideology to mobilize and kill fellow citizens, and you have seen a number of those, the fbi has worked very well to disrupt. and i think officials, we could have those not on the radar screen. the times square bomber was not on anyone's radar screen when he emerged that day with his attempted car bomb. so we have to be concerned. those individuals trained themselves. >> we show this earlier. it is from the beginning of the month. the haqqani a network as a terrorist group. what is the greater? >> the threat is that this is a group that is not only amplified in the pakistan afghanistan region, but is the core of many of the worst attacks and instabilities in afghanistan. attacking u.s. troops and coalition troops and afghan security services. and the problem here, and the reason there is a long debate -- a two-year long debate about this is that the network forms part of a network of intelligence services and relies on and keeps in contact with to influence what happened in afghanistan. this is one of the major forms in the relationship between pakistan. how do you treat a gr
can create. a law enforcement fbi justice department's role to investigate those domestic terrorism, homeland security is more responsible for guarding our borders, northern, southern people coming by water and people coming by air as well as a lot of coordination with local law enforcement. so they have some law enforcement responsibilities, but if you are talking about giving and investigating a group you think may -- >> host: embrey to jump in because we need to go to the white house where they are going to do a moment of silence we want to listen and watch and come back to the discussion. [background noise] [background noise] [background noise] ♪ ♪ ♪ [background noise] >> a moment of silence this morning at the white house with the president and the first lady. you heard the bells rang at 8:46 eastern time when they were struck by their plan the 11 years ago on the september 11th 2001. nearly 3,000 americans died that day with the attacks of the world trade center, and the attacks of the pentagon here in washington. our cameras are up in new york where the world trade cent
heard bad information about the guy -- fbi agent who was tortured and other things happened to him. the bulk is on his hands. but the media doesn't think so. they protect him every time they can. i mean, who is supposed to stand up for the guys? you know what i'm saying? >> host: let's to go to nicholas burns. let's see how you think the administration handledded libya. >> guest: i have worked for republican and democratic administrations. i think it's unfair to level such a criticism in president obama. he has been a very strong leader on protecting this country as president bush was. and i think both presidents, since 9/11, have put security of the american people, our homeland security as job number one as they should. and they have both been strong in the area. it's unfair to assert that president obama has let down the guard. libya was a triple tragic event. he died two weeks ago today along with the three of the colleagues. the responsibility for guarding our embassy overseas is not the -- we don't have american military protecting our embassy. it's the host country that prov
partners including the fbi. the intelligence community is devoting more resources to identifying trafficking networks. it strengthened protection so that foreign-born workers know their rights. and most of all we are going after the traffickers. new anti-trafficking teams are dismantling their networks. last year we charged a record number of these predators with human trafficking. we are putting them where they belong, behind bars. [applause] but with more than 20 million victims of human trafficking around the world, think about that, more than 20 million, we have got a lot more to do. and that is why earlier this year i directed my to increase their efforts and today i can announce a series of additional steps that we are going to take. first we are going to do more to spot it and stop it. we will prepare a new assessment of human trafficking in the united states until we better understand the scope in the scale of the problem. we will strengthen training so investigators and law enforcement are even better equipped to take action and treat victims as victims, not as criminals
as criminals and the president first called in the fbi to deal with the challenge as if it was a criminal matter >> the question before i turn out to you guys is what have -- what would have been wrong with the president coming to the rose garden and saying i am horrified by what has happened in egypt and obviously horrified by what has been done in libya. the safety and security is my foremost responsibility. but i would like to stand here and remind the people of egypt and the president and the prime minister and acting prime minister of libya that american lives were laid on the line for you on the one side, and we supported your efforts on the other side. we stand with countries that stand with the rule of law and you need to understand that you need to do the same for us. thank you very much to the time we'd be looking into this and walk away. rather than the sort of, you know, excuse making about islam. would that have been wrong for the president to do that? >> actions speak louder than words. they are also sending the military. you can disagree the fact there was in the military a
of the government. transportation, security, f.b.i., education, scientific research, food testing. we know we know that's not going to happen. the larger point is this. in terms of deficit reduction, the ryan plan -- there's no other way to state it -- a fraud. this should come as no surprise. after all, congressman ryan supported the bush policies that got us into this deep fiscal hole in the first place. from the bush tax cut to two unfunded wars to the paid-for creation of medicare part-d, congressman ryan's fingerprints are all easer th over the big-sg bush policies. ryan voted against the simpson-bowles framework. when paul ryan had a chance to walk the walk on deficit reduction, he joined all the other house republicans on the commission in voting down the report. he urged speaker boehner to abandon the grand bargain talks with president obama. "the new york times" reported in 2011, "ryan appealed to representative cantor to cut off negotiations between the speaker and the white house because he didn't feel the terms of the emerging agreement adhered strictly enough to his conservative princ
, high-ranking member of the f.b.i., director of national intelligence, general clapper and the vice chairman of the joint chiefs of staff to tell us ostensibly what happened in the tragic death of christopher -- ambassador christopher stevens and three other brave americans. so we gathered down in the secret room, which everybody turns in their phones and blackberries, and we went in and listened to basically a description of america's military disposition in that part of the world, something which certainly does not warrant a super secret briefing. but more importantly than that, when the secretary and the others were asked exactly what happened, what happened here, what caused this tragedy? what was the sequence of events? in fact, it was senators, the ranking member of the intelligence committee, what happened? the answer was, well, that's still an ongoing investigation, and we can't tell you anything. we were supposed to be down there to hear what happened, to hear the administration's version of events of what happened. we were told nothing. we were told absolutely nothing. and
in washington, chief of staff to the fbi director robert meueller and he began the justice department lawyer to fill the position as the attorney general for national security he then served as the homeland security adviser to president george w. bush and is now in private practice in washington. ken, please. spec the panel starts off with a reference to playboy magazine, but i will see if i can catch my breath and go forward. thanks very much, pete. good to be here. i've been asked to talk about three cases. 1i guess you could call a national security case and then number to a more regular case. let me start with the national security case and that is called blabber versus amnesty international. it's actually standing case but it's a standing case relating to a challenge to what's called the fisa amendment act passed in 2008, and was an amendment through a very substantial amount of the foreign intelligence surveillance act passed in 1978, and to understand the standing issue of the stakes at play you have to understand the merits a little bit so let me get into them. >> for those watching
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17

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